Suffolk University logo
  • Tuition Fee:
  • Local: n/a
  • Foreign: $ 16.3k / Semester
  • Languages of instruction:
  • English
  • Deadline:
  • 15 2월 2016

    Description

    Suffolk’s English majors explore the powerful connections between literary themes and modern issues. You’ll learn to articulate strong points of view, compose your thoughts in an organized and creative way, identify major literary themes, and draw lessons from groundbreaking works that illuminate aspects of the human condition. Suffolk is also home to a branch of Sigma Tau Delta, the international English honor society.

    You’ll benefit from Suffolk’s proximity to the Boston Public Library, the country’s first large public library. Boston has been home to legendary writers for generations, including Emerson, Alcott, Thoreau, and Plath. Our campus is set among many literary landmarks—including the Old Corner Bookstore, part of the Freedom Trail. So it’s not surprising that writing is a strong focus here, with its own specialized concentration and minor:

    • Creative Writing

      Our Creative Writing students enjoy a series of workshops, many run by notable visiting scholars. Suffolk is also home to a dedicated

      English majors can participate in the .

    You’ll also have the chance to explore the foundations and impact of literature on society:

    • Classics Minor

      Students focus on the foundational texts and artistic expressions of the Greco-Roman and Judeo-Christian traditions in order to discover the qualities that make these works enduring in relevance. Students who major in English, history, humanities, world languages, or philosophy often choose to pursue the Classics minor. The History and Literature Honors Major

    Detailed Course Facts

    Application deadline February 15, 2015 Tuition fee
    • USD 16265 Semester (National)

    Full-time: 12-17 credits per semester $16,265

    Start date 2016 Credits 126 credits

    Students must complete a minimum of 126 credits for graduation.

    Duration full-time 48 months Languages Take an IELTS test
    • English
    Delivery mode On Campus Educational variant Full-time

    Course Content

    English Major Requirements: 9 courses, 36 creditsRequirements for the English major are satisfied by 36 credits of coursework in English in addition to ENG-213, which English majors should use to satisfy the Core Literature Requirement.
    • ENG-213 English Literature I

      Prerequisites:

      WRI-103 with a grade of B or above or WRI-102.

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Study of major writers of England from the beginning to the mid-18th century. Regularly assigned essays on the reading provide the basis for individualized instruction in clear, correct, and persuasive writing. Offered every semester.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

      Type:

      Humanities Literature Requirement

    Choose one of the following courses:

    • ENG-214 English Literature II

      Prerequisites:

      WRI 103 with a grade of B or above or WRI-102.

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Study of major English writers from the mid-18th century to the present. Regularly assigned essays on the reading provide the basis for individualized instruction in clear, correct and persuasive writing. Offered every semester.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

      Type:

      Humanities Literature Requirement

    • ENG-217 American Literature I

      Prerequisites:

      WRI-103 with a grade of B or above or WRI-102.

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Study of major American writing from its origins through 1865. Regularly assigned essays on reading provide the basis for individualized instruction in clear, correct, and persuasive writing. Offered every semester.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

      Type:

      Humanities Literature Requirement

    • ENG-218 American Literature II

      Prerequisites:

      WRI-103 with a grade of B or above or WRI-102.

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Study of major American writing from 1865 through the present. Regularly assigned essays on reading provide the basis for individualized instruction in clear, correct, and persuasive writing. Offered every semester.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

      Type:

      Humanities Literature Requirement

    Choose 1 course from each of the five groups of English courses listed below.

    Group 1: Approaches to English Studies

    Choose one of the following:

    • ENG-301 Gateway Seminar for Majors

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218 fewer than 80 credits

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      This course seeks to answer the following questions. What is literature? Why do we study literature? What methods aid the study of literature? What are English Studies all about? This course extends reading and writing skills, and provides more specialized terms, knowledge, and approaches to prepare students for study at the junior and senior level. Topics vary from term to term. Student must have completed 80 credits or less Normally offered Fall and Spring semesters.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

    • ENG-312 English Grammar and Usage

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      This course provides a thorough review and analysis of the rules of standard English grammar and usage, including the debate between prescriptive and descriptive grammar, the origin and authority of the rules taught in school and in handbooks of English, and the insights of modern linguistics. Normally offered alternate years

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-391 Research and Writing

      Prerequisites:

      WRI 102 or WRI 103

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      This course explores research and writing in the context of qualitative research, field work and bibliography. This course requires a lengthy report and project based on extended field work of at least 25 hours at an off-campus research site chosen by the student, approved by the instructor, and validated by a field site representative. This course fulfills the Expanded Classroom Requirement for CAS students. Normally offered alternate years.

      Term:

      Occasional

      Type:

      Expanded Classroom Requirement

    • ENG-393 History of English Language

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      This course provides a basic understanding of the historical development of the English language from its roots in the Indo-European family of languages to its status as the world language of today.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-394 Critical Prose

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 102 or 103

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      This course studies both the literary and rhetorical modes of expository essay writing. Readings will focus on the craft of writing, the art of revision and reflections on the reader-writer relationship. Students will be asked to analyze prose passages, compose critical essays and work in peer groups. Normally offered alternate years.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-396 Varieties of Workplace Writing

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 102 Or ENG 103

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      This course studies a variety of workplace writing including summaries,memos, letters, directions, descriptions, reports and other technical and professional documents. Students may be required to complete certain assignments in collaborative teams. Document design and layout will also be emphasized. Normally offered alternate years

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-407 Literary Theory

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      A seminar on current approaches to the interpretation of literature, including psychoanalysis, deconstruction and feminist criticism. Students will experiment with making use of theory in analyzing selected literary texts.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-421 Special Topics in Group 1: Approaches To English Studies

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      A course that fits Group 1 of the English major requirements with varying subject matter.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-430 Literature of the Vietnam War and the Post 9/11 Wars

      Prerequisites:

      Take ENG-213 ENG-214 ENG-215 ENG-216 ENG-217 or ENG-218;

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      This course will examine some of the fiction, non-fiction, and poetry produced in response to the Vietnam War and the most recent war in Iraq. In addition to comparing the literature that has emerged from these two very different wars, these texts will also be examined in relation to peace studies, a field in which there is an emerging consensus that literature and the arts must play a central role in examining questions of war and peace.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-H521 Honors Seminar in Group 1: Approaches to English Studies

      Prerequisites:

      ENG-213 ENG-214 ENG-215, 216, 217 OR 218 Admission by invitation only

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Honors seminar that fulfills Group I of the English major.

    It is recommended that majors choosing ENG-301 take the course in the 2nd semester of sophomore year or the 1st semester of junior year.

    Group 2: Genre and Backgrounds

    Choose one of the following:

    • ENG-311 Medieval Literature Survey

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      An introduction to medieval literature, this course will focus on short readings from various genres, such as the lyric, chronicle, fable, with emphasis on the romance. The culmination of the course is a drama segment in which students can participate in a performance.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-315 Classical Drama

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Greek and Roman drama from its origins; characteristics of the theater; development of tragedy and comedy. Readings in Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, Plautus, Terrence, and Seneca. Normally offered every third year

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-316 Fifth Century Athens

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      An introduction to Periclean Athens, the golden age of classical Greek literature and thought. Close readings of selections from the historians Herodotus and Thucydides, the dramatists Aeschylus and Euripides, the poetry of Pindar, and Plato's great work on politics, The Republic. Cross-listed with History 336.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-317 Classical Mythology

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Ancient Greek and Roman myths, their motifs, themes and interpretations. Normally offered every third year.

    • ENG-370 Fiction Writing Workshop I

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      An intensive workshop in which the student will be required to write original fiction. The focus of the course will be on the student's own work, submitted on a weekly basis. The course will also provide the student writer with practical experience in matters of plot, character, dialogue, structure, etc. Normally offered annually.

      Term:

      Alternates Fall & Spring

    • ENG-371 Creative Non-Fiction Workshop

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      For students interested in writing autobiography and/or other forms of the personal essay. Topics can include childhood, place, sexuality, religion, work, the nature of memory. The focus will be on the writing process, with students presenting work-in-progress to the class for discussion and revision. The student should plan to read models of creative non-fiction. Normally offered annually.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-372 The Literary Journal

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      An exploration of selected literary journals and their role in American letters. Through our study of the Pushcart prize anthology and past and current issues of journals such as Agni, Antaeus, Callaloo, Georgia Review, Paris Review, Poetry, and Zoetrope, we will examine the ways in which journals both respond to and shape literary culture. Students will write a research paper on an essayist, poet, or story writer that they discover during this course. Taught by the editor of a Boston-area literary journal.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-374 Drama Seminar

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Discussion and presentations on a pre-announced subject: a major playwright, a dramatic movement or genre, or the relation between script and performance. Normally offered every third year.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-375 Poetry Writing Workshop I

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      An intensive workshop course in which the student will be required to write original poetry for each class meeting. The focus of the course will be on the student's own work. We will examine the highly individual processes of composition and revision, and the methods writers use to keep their own practice of poetry alive and well. We will also examine as many of the constituent elements of poetry as possible, from image and rhythm to line and structure. Normally offered annually.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

    • ENG-395 Rhetoric and Memoir

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 102 or 103

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      This course examines the rhetoric of memoirs written primarily by international figures who seek to use personal stories to shape readers' perspectives on political issues. After a brief introduction to rhetorical theory and to the genre of memoir, this course will examine contemporary memoirs that address such issues as racism, sexism, religious extremism, war, and genocide.

      Term:

      Occasional

      Type:

      Cultural Diversity Opt B

    • ENG-422 Special Topics in Group 2: Genre and Backgrounds

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      A course that fits Group 2 of the English major requirements with varying subject matter.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-470 Fiction Workshop II

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 370 or ENG 371

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      An intensive practical examination of plot, narrative, characterization, and style in the writing of fiction and/or creative non-fiction. Particular attention will be devoted to group discussion of weekly student writing assignments. Normally offered alternate years.

      Term:

      Alternates Fall & Spring

    • ENG-475 Poetry Workshop II

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 375 or instructor?s permission

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      An intensive workshop course in which the student will be required to write original poetry for each class meeting. The focus of the course will be on both the quantity and quality of the student's own work. There will also be specific assignments in the many formal elements of the art. Written self-evaluations will also be required. Normally offered in alternate years.

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

    Group 3: Literary History I, Medieval to the Renaissance

    Choose one of the following:

    • ENG-319 Renaissance Literature

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Literature of the golden age of the Renaissance with a focus on love and sexuality and the politics of the courts of Henry VIII and Elizabeth I. Authors studied include Shakespeare, Marlowe, Sidney, and Spenser. This course requires prior approval in order to count towards the Women's and Gender Studies Minor. Students should consult with the instructor and the director of the WGS Minor no later than the first week of classes.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-324 Shakespeare's Comedies

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Shakespeare's background and development as a dramatist through an examination of selected comedies. Collateral reading of the minor plays and Shakespeare criticism. Normally offered every third semester.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-325 Shakespeare's Histories

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Shakespeare's English and Roman history plays. Emphasis on Shakespeare's use of his sources and the plays in performance. Normally offered every third semester.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-326 Shakespeare's Tragedies

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Shakespeare's major tragedies reflecting the range, resourcefulness, and power of his dramaturgy. Collateral reading in Shakespeare criticism. Normally offered every third semester.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-333 English Renaissance Drama

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      The comedies and tragedies of major dramatists (excluding Shakespeare) of the Elizabethan and Jacobean eras. Marlowe, Jonson, Middleton, Webster. Normally offered alternate years.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-334 17th Century Literature

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Representative selections of seventeenth-century poetry and prose, including Behn, Burton, Donne Drayton, Dryden, Jonson, Milton, Pepys, Wroth, and others. Normally offered alternate years.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-335 Milton

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Poetry and prose of England's greatest Renaissance poet. The centerpiece of the course is close reading of Paradise Lost. Normally offered alternate years.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-423 Special Topics in Group 3: Literary History I : Medieval to Renaissance

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      A course that fits Group 3 of the English major requirements with varying subject matter.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-H523 Honors Seminar in Group 3: Literary History I: Medieval to Renaissance

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, 214, 215, 216, 217 OR 218 Admission By Invitation Only

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Honors seminar that fulfills Group 3 of the English major.

    Group 4: Literary History II, American or British Literature from 1700-1900

    Choose one of the following:

    • ENG-336 Restoration and Eighteenth Century Literature

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      The great age of satire, essay, criticism, biography, and nature. Dryden, Pope, Swift, Addison, Steele, Boswell, Johnson, Gray, Thompson, and Gibbon. Normally offered alternate years.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-337 18th Century English Novel

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      The beginnings of the realistic novel including the works of Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Smollet, and Burney and considering the sentimental novel (Sterne) and the gothic novel (Walpole and Radcliffe). Normally offered alternate years.

    • ENG-343 19th Century English Novel

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Development of the Romantic and Victorian novel. Readings in major works of the Brontes, Dickens, Thackeray, Austen, Eliot and Hardy. Normally offered alternate years.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-344 English Romantic Literature

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      The mind and spirit, poetics and poetry of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley and Keats, along with selected prose. Normally offered alternate years.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-345 Victorian Literature

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      The study of selected poets and prose writers. Some Victorian fiction. Normally offered alternate years

    • ENG-352 Global American Literature

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Study of antebellum American and African American literature in the context of cosmopolitan modes of thought and revolutionary action. This course considers how writers balanced their interest in building a national culture with their concern for matters of race, gender, politics and civil rights that transcended their time and place. Readings include nineteenth-century works by Longfellow, Irving, Emerson, Fuller, Whitman, Thoreau, Melville, and Douglass, as well as twentieth-century responses from Hemingway, Gandhi, King and Johnson.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-353 American Realism

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      In-depth exploration of American Realism from the post-Civil War era to the pre-WWI era (roughly 1875 to 1915). Particular emphasis is given to the role of houses and material and consumer culture in the forging of American identity. Authors may include Howells, Twain, James and Wharton among others. Normally offered alternate years. Students will also visit authors' houses in the Boston area. This course requires prior approval in order to count towards the Women's and Gender Studies Minor. Students should consult with the instructor and the director of the WGS Minor no later than the first week of classes.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-354 Hawthorne, Melville and Stowe

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      An extended study of three major novels by Hawthorne, Melville and Stowe as prototypes of the Great American Novel: an elusive achievement that seeks to capture the essence of American experience. This course confronts issues of sin and redemption, ambition and failure, racial and national identity, and aesthetic and cultural value, and it assesses the imaginative influence of these foundational narratives in two contemporary rewritings by Mukherjee and Reed. This course requires prior approval in order to count towards the Women's and Gender Studies Minor. Students should consult with the instructor and the director of the WGS Minor no later than the first week of classes.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-355 American Prose 1870 - 1920

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      The revolution in American literary consciousness between the Civil War and the First World War, and the transition from the traditional to the modern, in the work of Mark Twain, Henry James, Stephen Crane, Theodore Dreiser, and others. Normally offered alternate years.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-356 Whitman and Dickinson

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      An investigation of the lives and works of two of nineteenth-century America's greatest and most original poets. Topics will include types of poetic language and formal structure, the work of the poetic imagination in transforming observations of the world into art, and the ways in which poets process the idea of death and the reality of war. Finally, this course examines Whitman and Dickinson's impact on American popular culture as well as on the writings of modern poets and literary critics.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-424 Special Topics in Group 4: Literary History II : 1700-1900, American or British

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      A course that fits Group 4 of the English major requirements with varying subject matter. A interdisciplinary offering that features the writing of three of the late 19th century's greatest minds: Henry, the novelist who wrote The Portrait of a Lady, Daisy Miller, and The Turn of the Screw; William, the philosopher and psychologist who wrote Principles of Psychology (1890) and Varieties of Religious Experience (1902); and Alice, their sister, who became a feminist icon through her remarkable diary. A selection of these works will be explored alongside a James family biography.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-H524 Honors Seminar in Group 4: Literary History II: 1700 - 1900, American Or British

      Prerequisites:

      ENG-213, 214, 215, 216, 217 OR ENG 218 Admission by invitation only

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Honors seminar that fulfills Group I of the English major.

    Group 5: Literary History III, American, British, or World Literature, 1900-Present

    Choose one of the following:

    • ENG-357 African-American Lit I

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      African-American writing from the beginning through the present. Normally offered alternate years. Cultural Diversity A

      Term:

      Occasional

      Type:

      Cultural Diversity Opt A

    • ENG-359 Selected African-American Writers

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      This course focuses upon the literary contributions of a selected number of major African-American authors. Normally offered every other year.

      Type:

      Cultural Diversity Opt A

    • ENG-360 Mid-20th Century American Fiction 1950-1975

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      The course will cover major works of American fiction from the period between World War II and the end of the American war in Vietnam. The course will consider fiction from the Beat Generation, New Journalism, the Black Arts Movement, and postmodernism as well as major writers who aren't easily classified. Possible authors include Ellison, Kerouac, O'Connor, McCarthy, Cheever, Roth, Updike, Didion, Mailer, Bellow, Bambara, Barth, and Pynchon.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-361 Contemporary American Fiction

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      The course will cover major works of American fiction from the period between the end of the American war in Vietnam and the present. The course will emphasize fiction reflecting America's cultural diversity and current trends in fiction.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-362 Asian American Literature

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      An introduction to selected Asian-American writers with an emphasis on socio-cultural issues, such as race, gender and ethnicity. Authors include Bulosan, Hwang, Jen, Kingston, Lee, Mukherjee, Odada, and Tan. Cultural Diversity A

      Term:

      Occasional

      Type:

      Cultural Diversity Opt A,Asian Studies

    • ENG-363 Modern British Poetry

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Yeats, Eliot, Auden, Dylan Thomas, Philip Larkin, Seamus Heaney and Ted Hughes and the considerable achievements of other poets from WWI to the present, including the influences of the Georgians, the imagists and the new poets. Verse drama will also be considered.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-365 Contemporary American Poetry

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      An in-depth examination of American poetry since 1950, to include writers such as Robert Lowell, Theodore Roethke, John Berryman, Sylvia Plath, Anne Sexton, William Stafford, Elizabeth Bishop, Lucille Clifton, Adrienne Rich, Philip Levine, Galway Kinnell, James Wright, Robert Bly, Charles Olson, Allen Ginsberg, Rita Dove, Robert Hass, and Yusef Komunyakaa, among others. Normally offered alternate years.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-366 Modern British Fiction

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      English 336 Restoration and 18th Century Literature: Poetry, prose, and drama from 1660 to 1800, including works by Aphra Behn, Dryden, Congreve, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, Pope, Gay, Swift, and Johnson.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-367 American Fiction 1920-1950

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, 214, 215, 216, 217 OR ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      A sampling of major American fiction from the Jazz Age, the Great Depression, and the years surrounding World War II. Possible authors include Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway, Jean Toomer, F. Scott Fitzgerald, William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, Nella Larsen, John Steinbeck, Richard Wright, and Mary McCarthy.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-368 Modern British Drama

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Important playwrights and their productions: Wilde, Shaw, Galsworthy, Maugham, Synge, O'Casey, Coward, Osborne, Pinter, Beckett, Stoppard, Keatley, and others. Topics: The New Woman," Bright Young Things," Angry Young Men," and more. Normally offered every third year.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-369 Modern American Drama

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Study of plays and productions from the late 19th century to the present. Playwrights included: Moody, Herne, Sheldon, O'Neill, Glaspell, Crothers, Treadwell, Sherwood, Kaufman and Hart,Saroyan, Odets. Williams, Miller, Albee, Mamet, among others. Significant performers, directors, theatre critics, Broadway culture, and popular theatre provide context.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-373 English Writers of the 1930S

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      The social, political and cultural revolution in pre-World War II England as it is reflected in the poetry of Auden and Spender and the fiction of Huxley, Waugh, Isherwood, Bowen, Orwell, and Greene. Normally offered every third year.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-376 Contemporary British Fiction

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      This course explores the development of post-World War II British fiction from the 1950's to the present. The focus is on the consequences in literature and culture of the fall of Empire and the redefining of Englishness and on the tension between realism and postmodern literary experimentation.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-392 Readings in Post-Colonial Literature

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      An Exploration of Post-colonial literature and how the empire writes back following the collapse of European colonialism. Special emphasis will be placed on the legacy of British Colonial rule and the contemporary use of literature and the English Language to both resist and problematize Eurocentric cultural assumptions. Authors studied will include E.M. Foster, Salman Rushdie, J.M. Coetzee, Anita Desai, Hanif Kureishi, and Zadie Smith, among others. Students will be introduced to Post-colonial critical theory and view film adaptations of literary texts.

      Term:

      Occasional

      Type:

      Cultural Diversity Opt B

    • ENG-399 Irish Literature

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Writers of the Irish Literary Revival, from the 1890s to the 1930s. Readings from Yeats, Joyce, Synge, O'Casey, and O'Flaherty. The influence of Anglo-Irish history on Irish writers. Normally offered every third year.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-409 Literary Bloomsbury: Woolf and Forster

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      This class will engage with the major novels and selected literary writings of two of the twentieth century's most important modernist voices, Virginia Woolf and E.M. Forster. We will approach their writings within the intellectual framework of British modernism and the cultural context of the Bloomsbury Group out of which they emerged. Special attention will be paid to their theoretical writings on fiction as well as their respective contributions to feminism and queer theory. The class will also view cinematic adaptations of certain novels and discuss how these films have contributed to the enduring appeal and status of these texts as classics of twentieth-century fiction.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-425 Special Topics in Group 5: Literary History III: 1900- Present American, British, Or World

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      A course that fits Group 5 of the English major requirements with varying subject matter.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENG-H525 Honors Seminar in Group 5 Literary History III: 1900 - Present American, British, Or World.

      Prerequisites:

      ENG 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, or ENG 218; Invitation only

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Honors seminar that fulfills Group I of the English major.

    Choose 1 elective at the 300-level or above.

    Choose 2 electives from any English course numbered above 104.

    Note: The Seminar for Freshman may satisfy one of the electives at the discretion of the department.

    Transfer students with an English major must complete at least 12 credits of English courses at Suffolk beyond the sophomore literature requirement (ENG-213, ENG-214, ENG-217, ENG-218).

    Sophomore Survey Requirement

    All English majors must take two sophomore surveys, including ENG-213. Each course offers an introduction to a significant body of literature in English with continued instruction in reading and writing skills.

    • ENG-213 English Literature I

      Prerequisites:

      WRI-103 with a grade of B or above or WRI-102.

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Study of major writers of England from the beginning to the mid-18th century. Regularly assigned essays on the reading provide the basis for individualized instruction in clear, correct, and persuasive writing. Offered every semester.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

      Type:

      Humanities Literature Requirement

    Choose one of the following courses to satisfy the second Sophomore Survey requirement:

    • ENG-214 English Literature II

      Prerequisites:

      WRI 103 with a grade of B or above or WRI-102.

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Study of major English writers from the mid-18th century to the present. Regularly assigned essays on the reading provide the basis for individualized instruction in clear, correct and persuasive writing. Offered every semester.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

      Type:

      Humanities Literature Requirement

    • ENG-217 American Literature I

      Prerequisites:

      WRI-103 with a grade of B or above or WRI-102.

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Study of major American writing from its origins through 1865. Regularly assigned essays on reading provide the basis for individualized instruction in clear, correct, and persuasive writing. Offered every semester.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

      Type:

      Humanities Literature Requirement

    • ENG-218 American Literature II

    USA requirements for international students

    Each university in the Unites States of America sets its own admission standards so there isn't the same criteria for all the students and the university can decide which applicants meet those standards. The fee for each application is between $35 to $100. 

    After the selections of the universities you want to attend, the best of all would be to contact each university for an application form and more admission information for the international students. Moreover, for a graduate or postgraduate program it's necessary to verify the admission requirements. Some programs require that you send your application directly to their department. 

    Admissions decisions are based on students's academic record and different test scores, such as TOEFL, the SAT or ACT (for undergraduate programs) and GRE or GMAT (for graduate programs). Admission decision is based on your academic results and motivation.


    program_requirements

    English Language Requirements

    TOEFL paper-based test score : 550 TOEFL iBT® test : 77

    To study at this university, you have to speak English. We advice you to

    take an IELTS test. More About IELTS

    Requirements

    We do not use specific minimums for scores or grades in the decision process, but weigh all factors together to gain a whole view of you and your potential for success as a Suffolk University student:

    • Level and range of high school courses selected
    • Grades achieved (official high school transcript with senior year grades)
    • SAT or ACT scores (our code is 3771)
    • Recommendations (two required; one from a guidance counselor, one from a teacher)
    • The essay
    • Other required forms
    • Admission interview (optional)
    • Transfer students should view the transfer requirements page for more details.

    In high school, you should have completed:

    • Four units of English
    • Three units of mathematics (algebra I and II and geometry)
    • Two units of science (at least one with a lab)
    • Two units of language
    • One unit of American history
    • Four units distributed among other college preparatory electives

    We may also consider other factors in the review process, such as:

    • Class rank
    • Honors courses
    • AP courses

    We are also very interested in personal qualities that will offer us further insights into you as an applicant, including:

    • Admission interview
    • Extracurricular involvement
    • Community service
    • Special interests

    Work Experience

    No work experience is required.

    Related Scholarships*

    • Academic Excellence Scholarship

      "The Academic Excellence Scholarship can provide up to a 50 % reduction in tuition per semester. These scholarships will be renewed if the student maintains superior academic performance during each semester of their 3-year Bachelor programme. The scholarship will be directly applied to the student’s tuition fees."

    • Alumni Study Travel Fund

      Scholarships for students who are already attending the University of Reading.

    • Amsterdam Merit Scholarships

      The University of Amsterdam aims to attract the world’s brightest students to its international classrooms. Outstanding students from outside the European Economic Area can apply for an Amsterdam Merit Scholarship.

    * The scholarships shown on this page are suggestions first and foremost. They could be offered by other organisations than Suffolk University.

    Similar programs:
    Suffolk University logo
    • Tuition Fee:
    • International students: $ 16.3k / Semester
      Suffolk University logo
      • Tuition Fee:
      • International students: $ 16.3k / Semester
        University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill logo
        • Tuition Fee:
        • Domestic students: $ 24.9k / Year
        • International students: $ 52.5k / Year
        • Ranking:
        • 1784 StudyQA
          University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign logo
          • Tuition Fee:
          • Domestic students: $ 8.18k / year
          • International students: $ 17.7k / year
          • Ranking:
          • 1449 StudyQA
          • Duration:
          • 2 years
            See all of the 101 similar programs