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  • Tuition Fee:
  • Local: n/a
  • Foreign: $ 16.3k / Semester
  • Languages of instruction:
  • English
  • Deadline:
  • 15 2월 2016

    Description

    Biologists are detectives: Their mission is to figure out what makes organisms thrive or fail. This major places you at the forefront of an essential and rapidly growing field: Many biologists go on to work in medicine, conduct research to cure diseases, and solve public health problems. As a biologist-in-training, you’ll analyze the characteristics and behaviors of all living things using lessons drawn from chemistry, mathematics, and physics.

    You’ll earn either a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science in biology, depending on your area of focus. You’ll begin with a well-rounded assortment of courses in both the laboratory and classroom focusing on evolution, genetics, ecology, bioethics, and physiology. These experiences will teach you scientific research methods and reporting. Our program emphasizes collaboration: The major has an especially low professor-to-student ratio, and many of your classes will have fewer than 20 students. A professor-mentor will then help you choose just the right concentration:

    Choose concentrations in:

    Marine Science

    This immersive concentration features hands-on fieldwork at our research facility in northern Maine, the R.S. Friedman Field Station. This concentration prepares you for a career as a marine biologist, conservationist, zoologist, and other fields related to ecology.

    Biotechnology

    This concentration focuses on molecular and microbiology, with a special emphasis on hands-on laboratory opportunities between your sophomore and junior year. You’ll be well-prepared for a career in research or medicine.

    Detailed Course Facts

    Application deadline February 15, 2015 Tuition fee
    • USD 16265 Semester (National)

    Full-time: 12-17 credits per semester $16,265

    Start date 2016 Credits 126 credits

    Students must complete a minimum of 126 credits for graduation.

    Duration full-time 48 months Languages Take an IELTS test
    • English
    Delivery mode On Campus Educational variant Full-time

    Course Content

    Biology majors may obtain a Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts in Biology. Concentrations in biotechnology and marine science are also available. A Biology major must take 10 courses in biology plus designated related science and math courses, in addition to the all-college requirements.

    Transfer students wishing to major in biology must complete a minimum of four biology courses (with lab if appropriate) plus senior seminar in biology at Suffolk University with a minimum grade point average of 2.0.

    Core Requirements (17 courses and their corresponding labs)

    • BIO-111 Introduction to the Cell

      Prerequisites:

      Must take BIO L111 concurrently

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Explanation of key biological structures and reactions of the cell. This is an introductory course required of all biology majors and minors, and some non-biology science majors. This course is not recommended for the non-science student.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

    • BIO-L111 Introduction to the Cell Laboratory

      Prerequisites:

      Concurrently with BIO 111

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      Sessions are designed to familiarize the student with biological molecules, and the techniques used in their study. The techniques covered include basic solution preparation, separation and quantification of molecules, enzyme catalysis,and cell isolation.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

    • BIO-114 Organismal Biology

      Prerequisites:

      Must take BIO L114 concurrently.

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Introduction to organismal biology emphasizing evolution, phylogenetics, form, and function. Only when offered in Fall participation in the annual October (Columbus Day Weekend) field trip to the Friedman Field Station is mandatory (a small fee is associated with this trip).

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

      Type:

      SCI TECH ENGNR

    • BIO-L114 Organismal Biology Laboratory

      Prerequisites:

      Must take BIO 114 concurrently

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      A series of laboratory experiences in evolution, diversity, anatomy and physiology.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

      Type:

      SCI TECH ENGNR

    • BIO-274 Genetics

      Prerequisites:

      BIO 111/L111 and BIO 114/L114; BIO L274 concurrently;

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      An examination of the basic principles of genetics in eukaryotes and prokaryotes at the level of molecules, cells, and multicellular organisms, including humans. Topics include Mendelian and non-Mendelian inheritance, structure and function of chromosomes and genomes, biological variation resulting from recombination, mutation, and selection, and population genetics.

      Term:

      Offered Fall Term

    • BIO-L274 Genetics Lab

      Prerequisites:

      Must be taken concurrently with BIO 274.

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      Experiments designed to demonstrate principles presented in lecture, using a range of genetic model organisms that include E. coli, B. subtilis, S. cerevisiae, D. melanogaster, S. fimicola, and C. elegans.

      Term:

      Offered Fall Term

    • BIO-302 Writing for Research

      Prerequisites:

      BIO 111/L111 and BIO 114/L114; WRI 101 OR WRI 102;

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Development of skills for writing clearly, concisely, and creatively in the style of scientific journals. This course emphasizes the formulation of a research project of the student's choice and leads to a formal manuscript on the topic. Instruction includes literature search methods and software for the graphical presentation of data. Required of all biology majors.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

    • CHEM-111 General Chemistry I

      Prerequisites:

      Placement at MATH 104 or better. Students who do not place at MATH 104 must take MATH 104 concurrently. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM-L111.

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Fundamental principles of chemistry are discussed. Topics include introductions to atomic structure, stoichiometry, the periodic table, the nature of chemical bonds, and chemical reactions. This course is recommended for science and engineering majors or those considering careers in the health sciences.

      Term:

      Offered Fall Term

      Type:

      NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS,SCI TECH ENGNR

    • CHEM-L111 General Chemistry I Lab

      Prerequisites:

      Must be taken concurrently with CHEM 111.

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      Introduction to the basic principles of chemistry through discovery laboratory experiments. Students will be introduced to safe laboratory practices and basic techniques such as determining mass and volume, representing data in the form of tables and graphs, and synthesizing and isolating a metal complex. Workshop activities include understanding modern approaches to the scientific method, reading and understanding the scientific literature, and building molecular models. This laboratory is designed around the foundational laboratory skills practiced by science students in a wide variety of majors. 4-hour laboratory.

      Term:

      Offered Fall Term

      Type:

      NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS,SCI TECH ENGNR

    • CHEM-112 General Chemistry II

      Prerequisites:

      CHEM 111/L111; CHEM-L112 must be taken concurrently.

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      This course is a continuation of General Chemistry I. Fundamental principles of chemistry are discussed. Topics include introductions to thermochemistry, gases, solution chemistry, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base systems, and thermodynamics. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of CHEM 111 and CHEM L111. 3 hours of lecture 1 term - 3 credits.

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

      Type:

      NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS

    • CHEM-L112 General Chemistry II Lab

      Prerequisites:

      CHEM 112 must be taken concurrently;

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      This course is a continuation of General Chemistry I Lab. Students apply the basic principles of chemistry through discovery laboratory experiments. Quantitative analysis is emphasized. Students will be introduced to basic analytical techniques such as gravimetric analysis, the application of Beer's Law, and acid-base titrations. This laboratory is designed around the foundational laboratory skills practiced by science students in a wide variety of majors. 4-hour laboratory.

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

      Type:

      NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS

    • CHEM-211 Organic Chemistry I

      Prerequisites:

      CHEM 112

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Basic theories of structure, bonding, and chemical reactivity as specifically applied to modern organic chemistry. Topics include functional groups, acid/base chemistry, nomenclature, resonance, spectroscopy, and stereochemistry. Significant emphasis placed on the use of the arrow formalism to indicate the location and movement of electrons; serves as a basic introduction to organic mechanisms. Prerequisite: CHEM 112, L112 Concurrent enrollment in CHEM L211 required unless L211 has been previously completed. Concurrent enrollment in CHEM L211 required. 3 hours lecture. 1 term - 3 credits. Normally offered Fall, days/Summer I, evenings.

      Term:

      Offered Fall Term

    • CHEM-L211 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I

      Prerequisites:

      Must be taken concurrently with CHEM 211.

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      Laboratory exercises providing an introduction to synthetic organic chemistry techniques, including melting point determination, distillation, crystallization, extraction, chromatographic separations, and infrared spectroscopy. A component of this laboratory course incorporates discussions of experimental design within the context of environmentally benign (green) organic chemistry. Reports are prepared in professional style. Prerequisite: CHEM 112, L112. Concurrent enrollment in 211 required. 4-hour laboratory. 1 term - 1 credit. Normally offered Fall/Summer, days and evenings.

      Term:

      Offered Fall Term

    • CHEM-212 Organic Chemistry II

      Prerequisites:

      CHEM 211 CHEM L211

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Builds on the core competencies acquired in Organic Chemistry I, includes detailed discussions of organic mechanisms of substitution, elimination, and addition reactions. Significant emphasis is placed on organic synthesis, structure determination, and spectroscopy. Prerequisite: CHEM 211, L211. Concurrent enrollment in CHEM L212 required. 3 hours lecture. 1 term - 3 credits. Normally offered Spring, days/Summer II, evenings.

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

    • CHEM-L212 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II

      Prerequisites:

      CHEM 211/L211

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      Builds on the core competencies acquired in Organic Chemistry Laboratory I. Significant emphasis is placed on the characterization of organic molecules via nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A component of this laboratory course incorporates discussions of experimental design within the context of environmentally benign (green) organic chemistry. Reports are prepared in professional style. Concurrent enrollment in CHEM 212 required. 4-hour laboratory. Normally offered Spring/Summer II, days and evenings.

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

    • MATH-134 Calculus for Management & Social Sciences

      Prerequisites:

      MATH 104, MATH 121 or appropriate math placement score.

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      A one-semester introduction to differential and integral calculus. Theory is presented informally and topics and techniques are limited to polynomials, rational functions, logarithmic and exponential functions. Topics include a review of precalculus, linear regression, limits and continuity, derivatives, differentiation rules, implicit differentiation, related rates, applications of derivatives to graphing, minima/maxima, applications of the derivative, marginal analysis, differential equations of growth and decay, anti-derivatives, the definite integral, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, area measurements. This course cannot be used to satisfy core or complementary requirements by students majoring in chemistry, computer science, engineering, mathematics, or physics. Several sections offered each semester. *This course cannot be applied toward a departmental concentration in Mathematics by Sawyer Business School students.

    or higher level Mathematics course

    Choose one of the following sequences:

    • PHYS-111 College Physics I

      Prerequisites:

      Take MATH-121 or MATH-134 or permission of Physics department chair;PHYS L111 taken concurrently

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Introduction to the fundamental principles of physics. Study of vectors, Newton's laws, rotations, rigid body statics and dynamics, simple harmonic motion, heat and thermodynamics, kinetic theory. The laboratory consists of experiments to illustrate the basic concepts studied in the course.

      Term:

      Offered Fall Term

      Type:

      NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS,SCI TECH ENGNR

    • PHYS-L111 College Physics Lab I

      Prerequisites:

      PHYS 111 concurrently

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      Introduction to the fundamental principles of physics. Study of vectors, Newton's laws, rotations, rigid body statics and dynamics, simple harmonic motion, heat and thermodynamics, kinetic theory. The laboratory consists of experiments to illustrate the basic concepts studied in the course. Error propagation, use of Excel, laboratory notebooks and formal reports required.

      Term:

      Offered Fall Term

      Type:

      NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS,SCI TECH ENGNR

    • PHYS-112 College Physics II

      Prerequisites:

      PHYS 111 and Concurrently with PHYS L112

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Continuation of the fundamental principles of physics. Study of electric forces and fields, electric potential, DC circuits, electromagnetic induction, magnetic fields, AC circuits, introduction to optics, introduction to atomic, nuclear and particle physics.

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

      Type:

      NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS

    • PHYS-L112 College Physics Lab II

      Prerequisites:

      PHYS 111 and PHYS L111; PHYS 112 must be taken concurrently

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      Continuation of the fundamental principles of physics. Study of electric forces and fields, electric potential, DC circuits, electromagnetic induction, magnetic fields, AC circuits, introduction to optics, introduction to atomic, nuclear and particle physics. The laboratory consists of experiments to illustrate the basic concepts studied in the course. Error propagation, use of Excel, laboratory notebooks, and formal reports required.

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

      Type:

      NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS

    or
    • PHYS-151 University Physics I

      Prerequisites:

      Take MATH-121 or MATH 165. PHYS L151 concurrently

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Introduction to the fundamental principles of physics using calculus. The course includes the study of vectors, Newton's laws, rotations, rigid body statics and dynamics, simple harmonic motion, heat and temperature.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

      Type:

      NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS,SCI TECH ENGNR

    • PHYS-L151 University Physics Lab I

      Prerequisites:

      PHYS 151 concurrently

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      The laboratory consists of experiments to illustrate the basic concepts studied in the course: measurements, propagation of errors, vectors, Newton's laws, work and energy, momentum, rotations, oscillations, simple harmonic motion, fluid. Knowledge of algebra, trigonometry, differentiation and integration required.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

      Type:

      NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS,SCI TECH ENGNR

    • PHYS-152 University Physics II

      Prerequisites:

      PHYS 151, PHYS L152 concurrently

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      This calculus based course begins with topics in kinetic theory and the laws of thermodynamics. It then covers electric charge and field, Gauss' law, electrical potential and capacitance, electric currents and DC circuits. Next magnetism, electromagnetic induction, Faraday's law and AC circuits are discussed. This is followed by Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic waves, and properties of light.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

      Type:

      NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS,SCI TECH ENGNR

    • PHYS-L152 University Physics Lab II

      Prerequisites:

      PHYS 151 and L151 and PHYS 152 must be taken concurrently

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      The laboratory consists of experiments to illustrate the basic concepts studied in the course: heat, gas laws, electric forces, field, and potential, DC and AC circuits, magnetic field, electromagnetic induction, Faraday's law, optics. Calculus, algebra, trigonometry are required. Error propagation, use of Excel, laboratory notebooks, and formal reports required.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

      Type:

      NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS,SCI TECH ENGNR

    Choose one biology course and its corresponding laboratory (if applicable) from the molecular/cellular division:

    • BIO-262 Principles of Cell Culture

      Prerequisites:

      BIO 111, L111 and BIO 114, L114 and CHEM 111, L111

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      The course is designed as an application base educational experience that will allow students to learn the standard techniques associated with successful cell culture. As such, students are responsible for the maintenance, propagation, isolation, and preservation of their cells. A number of cell types and experimental manipulations of the cultures are investigated throughout the semester.

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

    • BIO-285 Microbiology

      Prerequisites:

      BIO-111 and BIO-L111; BIO-L285 concurrently;

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Viruses and bacteria are surveyed in terms of their ecology, biochemistry, taxonomy, molecular biology and control.

      Term:

      Offered Fall Term

    • BIO-L285 Microbiology Laboratory

      Prerequisites:

      BIO 111/L111; BIO 285 concurrently;

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      Introduction to microbiological techniques and their applications to health, research and industry.

      Term:

      Offered Fall Term

    • BIO-374 Genomics

      Prerequisites:

      BIO 111/L111, CHEM 111/L111, BIO 274/L274 Must take BIO L374 concurrently

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      What can we learn from genomics? In this course, you will develop an understanding of how cutting edge techniques from biotechnology are changing our views of biology. You will learn how genetic sequencing can be used for everything from tracing evolutionary histories in the tree of life to shedding light on biodiversity patterns of populations. With a focus on human genetics, you will also explore how genes are discovered and linked to phenotypic traits. Finally, you will consider methods of monitoring gene expression and how the resulting genetic networks can help medicine and drug development.

    • BIO-L374 Genomics Laboratory

      Prerequisites:

      BIO 111/L111, CHEM 111/L111, BIO 274/L274 Must take BIO 374 concurrently

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      In this course, you will develop an understanding of current genomic methods through collection and examination of your own data. In the first part of the lab, you will use sequencing techniques to compare genetic relationships and characterize the microbial biodiversity of a population. In the second part of the lab, you will focus on gene expression and functional genomics. You will determine the actions of a transcription factor through RNA-seq and also determine how a collection of uncharacterized transcription factors affect antibiotic sensitivity. In addition to reading primary literature and keeping a lab notebook, you will also learn how to analyze and present your genomics data.

    • BIO-377 Immunology

      Prerequisites:

      BIO-114/L114; CHEM-211/L211; BIO-L377 concurrently;

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      The concept of immunity, response to infection, structure of the immune system, biochemistry of immunoglobins, antigen-antibody interactions, allergy, immunological injury, lymphocyte subpopulations and cellular immunity, tolerance suppression and enhancement. Taught alternate/even years.

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

    • BIO-L377 Immunology Laboratory

      Prerequisites:

      BIO-114/L114; CHEM-211/L211; BIO-337 concurrently;

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      Anatomy of the immune system , immunoglobin purification, hemagglutination, enzyme immunoassay. Immuno-chemistry, immunoelectrophoresis, gel precipitation assay.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • BIO-385 Advanced Microbiology

      Prerequisites:

      BIO-285 and BIO-L285 BIO L385 must be taken concurrently

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Pathogenesis and host-parasite relationships; epidemiology and public health aspects of pathogenic microorganisms are stressed; molecular biology, applied and industrial microbiology. Current literature reviews. Taught alternate/odd years.

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

    • BIO-L385 Advanced Microbiology Lab

      Prerequisites:

      BIO 285/L285; BIO 385 must be taken concurrently

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      Isolation, quantization and cultivation of microorganisms, advanced general and applied microbiology and molecular biology. Experience in media, chemical and culture preparations.

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

    • BIO-403 Cell Biology

      Prerequisites:

      BIO 111/L111; CHEM-211/L211; BIO-L403 concurrently;

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      The study of cells, approached through examinations of biochemical mechanisms, the relation between the structure and function of biological molecules and organelles, and the regulation of normal and diseased cells.

      Term:

      Offered Fall Term

    • BIO-L403 Cell Biology Lab

      Prerequisites:

      BIO-111/L11; CHEM-211/L211; BIO-L403 concurrently;

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      Examination of biological molecules and their role in cell function. Techniques used in these examinations will include enzymatic analyses, gel electrophoresis, immunologic identification, chromatography, and spectroscopy. Students are expected to develop their proficiency in the laboratory techniques used, to analyze their results in a quantitative manner, and to present their findings.

      Term:

      Offered Fall Term

    • BIO-474 Molecular Genetics

      Prerequisites:

      CHEM-211/L211; and CHEM 331 or BIO-274/L274; BIO-L474 concurrently;

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      An examination of concepts and techniques of modern molecular biology. Topics include the structure and function of DNA, RNA, and proteins, the regulation of gene expression in prokaryotes and eukaryotes at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, genetic modification of organisms, and genome analysis. This course will incorporate readings and discussions of primary scientific literature. Spring semester.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • BIO-L474 Molecular Genetics Lab

      Prerequisites:

      Take CHEM-211 and CHEM-L211; Take CHEM-331 or BIO-274 and BIO-L274; BIO-474 must be taken concurrently;

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      This upper level laboratory course will consist of a semester-long project in the form of a series of consecutive experiments involving the generation of a genetically modified organism and its subsequent molecular analysis. Techniques employed will include genetic screens, DNA isolation, restriction endonuclease analysis, transformation of bacteria,gel electrophoresis, gene reported assays, RNA isolation, reverse transcription, and quantitative PCR.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • BIO-475 Developmental Biology

      Prerequisites:

      BIO-114, L114 and CHEM-211, L211 BIO L475 must be taken concurrently

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      An examination of the molecular, cellular, biochemical and environmental mechanisms that regulate the developmental processes in organisms with an emphasis on vertebrates. Topics include the processes of differentiation, determination, tissue induction and morphogenesis.

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

    • BIO-L475 Developmental Biology Lab

      Prerequisites:

      BIO 114/L114, CHEM 211/L211 BIO 475 must be taken concurrently

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      Laboratory includes the classic sequential study of developmental stages in the frog, pig and chicken using prepared slides. It also includes experimental manipulation of development in vertebrates and other organisms to a lesser degree. Prerequisite: BIO 202, BIO 114, BIO L114, CHEM 211, CHEM L211, Must take BIO 475 concurrently. 1 term - 1 credit.

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

    Choose one biology course and its corresponding laboratory class (if applicable) from the organismic structure and function division:

    • BIO-203 Anatomy and Physiology I

      Prerequisites:

      BIO L203 MUST BE TAKEN CONCURRENTLY BIO 111, BIO L111.

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      First part of a systematic survey of the structure and functional inter-relations of the organ systems of the human body. This course includes histology and discussion of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Medical terminology will be used.

      Term:

      Offered Fall Term

    • BIO-L203 Anatomy & Physiology Lab I

      Prerequisites:

      BIO 111/L111; Must take BIO-203 concurrently

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      A study of the human skeletal system and a comparative look at other organ systems involving observation of anatomical models and dissection of mammalian specimens. Also includes computer simulations of physiological processes.

      Term:

      Offered Fall Term

    • BIO-204 Anatomy and Physiology II

      Prerequisites:

      BIO 203, BIO L203; BIO L204 must be taken concurrently;

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Conclusion of the survey of the structure and function of inter-relations of the organ systems of the human body. This course investigates the endocrine,circulatory, respiratory,immunity, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Medical terminology will be used.

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

    • BIO-L204 Anatomy & Physiology Lab II

      Prerequisites:

      BIO 203/L203 and BIO 204 must be taken concurrently;

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      A study of the human viscera using anatomical models and dissection of mammalian specimens. Also includes microscopy of tissues.

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

    • BIO-225 Plant Biology

      Prerequisites:

      Bio 111, L111 and Bio 114, L114;Must be taken concurrently with L225.

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Course introduces students to the anatomy, physiology, systematics, ecology, and economic uses of all major groups of plants. Aspects of the biology of nonvascular, non-seed, gymnosperm, and angiosperm plants are explored. An overview of Kingdom Fungi is also covered. Each student is required to do a 10-15 minute presentation to the class highlighting the economic use of a group of plants assigned by the instructor. Normally offered Spring semester.

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

    • BIO-L225 Plant Biology Laboratory

      Prerequisites:

      BIO 111/L111 and BIO 114/L114; BIO 225 concurrently;

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      Lab exercises focus on plant anatomy, physiology, and systematics. Instruction in the identification of major plant families and fungal types is covered. Trips to a Boston area herbarium and botanical garden are required.

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

    • BIO-304 Comparative Animal Physiology

      Prerequisites:

      BIO 114/L114; BIO L304 concurrently;

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Mechanisms of physiological adaptations to environmental challenges are studied. Examples of gas exchange, osmoregulation, fluid transport, temperature regulation, nervous control, and movement are examined in various animal forms. Spring semester.

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

    • BIO-L304 Comp Animal Physiology Lab

      Prerequisites:

      BIO-114/L114; BIO-304 concurrently;

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      Selected physiological processes and mechanisms or adaptation in invertebrate and vertebrate animals are examined by observation and controlled experiments.

    • BIO-350 Vertebrate Biology

      Prerequisites:

      BIO-111/L111; BIO-114/L114; BIO-L350 concurrently;

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      This class will focus on the form and function of vertebrate animals from an evolutionary standpoint. The adaptations of major groups will be discussed in light of their phylogenetic history and ecology. A discussion of major adaptive radiations and abiotic factors that influenced these trends will also be highlighted.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • BIO-L350 Vertebrate Biology Lab

      Prerequisites:

      BIO-111/L111; BIO-114/L114; BIO-350 concurrently;

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      This lab will focus on the comparative anatomy of vertebrate animals. In-depth dissections will be the focus of the laboratory exercises. A Squalus shark, a Necturus salamander, a pigeon, and a mink will be examined in detail.

      Term:

      Occasional

    Choose one biology course and its corresponding laboratory class (if applicable) from the diversity, ecology, and evolution division:

    • BIO-222 Field Botany

      Prerequisites:

      BIO 111. This course will fulfill the Expanded Classroom Requirement.

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      A three-week camping excursion, during which common tracheotypes, bryophytes, algae, and other photosynthetic organisms characteristic of various habits in Maine will be identified. Emphasis will be on plant ecology including species interactions and habitat requirements. Vertical zonation in mountains, lakes and intertidal areas will be a point of focus. Participants will camp for one week at each of three sites: Baxter State Park, Central Maine (near Augusta),and the Friedman Field Station. Travel will be by van(s) and hiking (up to ten miles a day) over difficult terrain. Sleeping bags and tents required. Additional fees: Camping and food est. $475.00. ECR. The three-week camping excursion typically runs from late May (after tradition Spring course finals are over) into June. Taught alternate years.

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

      Type:

      Expanded Classroom Requirement

    • BIO-254 Marine Biology

      Prerequisites:

      BIO-111/L111 or BIO-114/L114 or Instructor's consent; BIO-L254 concurrently;

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Introduction to the marine environment, its organisms and their specific adaptations. Emphasis on marine and estuarine ecology, intertidal habits, trophic relations, and physiology. Human impacts on the sea; fisheries, mariculture, pollution, law of the sea. Taught only at the R. S. Friedman Field Station Campus, Edmunds, ME. ECR. This course typically meets for three weeks from early to mid-August to early September (before typical Fall courses begin). Taught alternate years.

      Term:

      Offered Fall Term

      Type:

      Expanded Classroom Requirement

    • BIO-L254 Marine Biology Lab

      Prerequisites:

      BIO-111/L111 or BIO-114/L114 or Instructor's consent; BIO-254 concurrently;

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      Field trips to local marine environments; field and laboratory observations of marine organisms. Independent student projects. Taught only at the R.S. Friedman Field Station Campus, Edmunds, ME. ECR

      Term:

      Offered Fall Term

      Type:

      Expanded Classroom Requirement

    • BIO-315 Animal Behavior

      Prerequisites:

      BIO-114/L114

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Surveys animal behavior in a range of species (invertebrates, birds, fish, mammals including humans) to assess similarities and differences in the evolution of behaviors and their physiological mechanisms by which individual organisms and species adapt to their environments. Topics include: predator evasion; mating systems; parental care; social behavior; and learning.

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

    • BIO-333 Ecology

      Prerequisites:

      BIO-114/L114; BIO-L333 concurrently;

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Areas of study include but are not limited to basic principles of population biology, community ecology, trophic dynamics, ecosystem structure and function and evolutionary theory.(note: some aspects of the course may differ depending on if it is a Boston or a FFS offering) ECR. Offered even years at both the Boston campus (Fall semester) and the R.S. Friedman Field Station Campus (FFS),Edmunds, ME (Early Fall offering for three weeks). There is a $475 camping fee associated with the FFS BIO 333 offering.

      Term:

      Offered Fall Term

      Type:

      Expanded Classroom Requirement

    • BIO-L333 Ecology Lab

      Prerequisites:

      BIO-114/L114; BIO-333 concurrently;

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      Field and laboratory experiences in techniques and concepts relevant to lecture materials; data collecting and report preparation. Group project with data collection, presentation and report preparation is required. (note some aspects of the lab may differ depending on whether it is a Boston or a FFS offering) ECR

      Term:

      Offered Fall Term

    • BIO-337 Evolution

      Prerequisites:

      Take BIO-111 BIO-L111 BIO-114 BIO-L114. BIO 274 recommended.

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      A survey of evolutionary theory, exploring processes such as the genetic sources of variation, natural and sexual selection, and evolutionary developmental biology. Using phylogenetic systematics and other tools, we will demonstrate how these mechanisms result in the visible patterns of evolution. This is a reading and writing intensive course centered on close reading of Origin of the Species and discussion of recent peer-reviewed literature about evolution.

      Term:

      Offered Fall Term

    • BIO-345 The Biology of Vector Borne Diseases

      Prerequisites:

      BIO-114/L114;

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      A survey of the occurrence, life history and pathogenicity of the most important arthropod-borne, human diseases both internationally (malaria, dengue, plague, trypanosomiasis, yellow fever, etc.) and within the United States (Lyme disease, EEE, West Nile Virus, and others). Demographic and environmental factors leading to the re-emergence and spread of these diseases will be considered.

    • BIO-357 Biology of Fishes

      Prerequisites:

      BIO 114/L114, and Junior standing. Requires permission from Marine Sciences Coordinator.

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      The evolution, systematics, anatomy, physiology and behavior of freshwater, marine and anadromous fishes from temperate to tropical environments. The interactions of fish in their environments, including predator-prey relationships, host-symbiont interactions, and fish as herbivores. Taken with permission from the Marine Science Consortium Coordinator. [This is a Marine Science Consortium Course and enrollment is limited] Evenings only: off campus

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

    Choose 3 biology course electives and their corresponding laboratory classes (if applicable). Any of the courses listed above may be taken as an elective if another course is taken to fulfill the division requirement. Additional elective options are:

    • BIO-213 Bio-Ethical Issues

      Prerequisites:

      BIO 111/L111 or BIO 114/L114;

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      An introduction to ethical issues raised by advances in the biosciences and biotechnology. Topics include genetically modified organisms, reproductive technologies, genetic screening and privacy issues, therapeutic cloning, human uses of animals, and environmental sustainability. This course will provide an introductory philosophical background to bioethics, surveying several major ethical theories. A general understanding of the biosciences will be presumed.

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

    • BIO-273 Biostatistics

      Prerequisites:

      BIO 111/L111

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Introduction to the application of statistical methods for the evaluation of biological problems. Sampling, confidence intervals, hypothesis tests, experimental design, analysis of variance, regression, and correlation are some of the topics offered.

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

      Type:

      Quantitative Reasoning

    • BIO-510 Independent Study

      Prerequisites:

      An independent study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office.

      Credits:

      1.00- 5.00

      Description:

      Student projects may be initiated by a student or faculty member with the approval of the Chairperson. A written proposal which must have majority approval of the Biology Faculty is required prior to enrolling. A paper and oral report are required. Only ONE independent study may be used toward biology electives.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

    • CHEM-331 Biochemistry I

      Prerequisites:

      CHEM 212/L212 or permission of instructor. CHEM L331 must be taken concurrently.

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      This course explores the foundations of biochemistry, including the structure, organization and behavior of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. Topics include enzyme kinetics, membrane structure and signal-transduction pathways. Students will be introduced to the biochemical literature and computer-based bioinformatics techniques. Prerequisites: CHEM 212/L212 or permission of instructor. Concurrent enrollment in CHEM L331 required. 3 hours of lecture per week. Offered every Fall, days only.

      Term:

      Offered Fall Term

    • CHEM-L331 Biochemical Techniques I

    USA requirements for international students

    Each university in the Unites States of America sets its own admission standards so there isn't the same criteria for all the students and the university can decide which applicants meet those standards. The fee for each application is between $35 to $100. 

    After the selections of the universities you want to attend, the best of all would be to contact each university for an application form and more admission information for the international students. Moreover, for a graduate or postgraduate program it's necessary to verify the admission requirements. Some programs require that you send your application directly to their department. 

    Admissions decisions are based on students's academic record and different test scores, such as TOEFL, the SAT or ACT (for undergraduate programs) and GRE or GMAT (for graduate programs). Admission decision is based on your academic results and motivation.


    program_requirements

    English Language Requirements

    TOEFL paper-based test score : 550 TOEFL iBT® test : 77

    To study at this university, you have to speak English. We advice you to

    take an IELTS test. More About IELTS

    Requirements

    We do not use specific minimums for scores or grades in the decision process, but weigh all factors together to gain a whole view of you and your potential for success as a Suffolk University student:

    • Level and range of high school courses selected
    • Grades achieved (official high school transcript with senior year grades)
    • SAT or ACT scores (our code is 3771)
    • Recommendations (two required; one from a guidance counselor, one from a teacher)
    • The essay
    • Other required forms
    • Admission interview (optional)
    • Transfer students should view the transfer requirements page for more details.

    In high school, you should have completed:

    • Four units of English
    • Three units of mathematics (algebra I and II and geometry)
    • Two units of science (at least one with a lab)
    • Two units of language
    • One unit of American history
    • Four units distributed among other college preparatory electives

    We may also consider other factors in the review process, such as:

    • Class rank
    • Honors courses
    • AP courses

    We are also very interested in personal qualities that will offer us further insights into you as an applicant, including:

    • Admission interview
    • Extracurricular involvement
    • Community service
    • Special interests

    Work Experience

    No work experience is required.

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